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Hanley

Practical Functional Assessment and Treatment of Severe Problem Behavior, Stereotipy, and Sleep Problems

Five-Part Workshop Distributed over Three Days

 

Date: April 19, 20, 21, 2018

From 9.30 am to 5.30 pm

 

Location: Teatro del Baraccano, via Santo Stefano, Bologna

21 CEU credits for BCBA and BCaBA: 4 Ethics, 3 Supervision

Fee: 350€, coffee breaks are included.

Please note that for administrative purposes, workshop attendance is reserved to members of the association Pane e Cioccolata, for this reason a €20 registration fee will be required at the desk on the morning of the day.

 

Presenter: Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Western New England University

University of Massachusetts Medical School

 

Dr. Hanley has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for 25 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, was degreed at the University of Florida, was tenured at the University of Kansas, and is currently a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program at Western New England University and an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published over 100 book chapters and articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching tactics for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), past Editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP), and a past Associate Editor of The Behavior Analyst, the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), and BAP, and current Editor of JABA.

 

Relevant website: http://practicalfunctionalassessment.com

 


Part 1

 

Behavioral intervention can be effective for addressing problem behavior like meltdowns, self-injury, and aggression, especially when a functional assessment of the problem is conducted to determine why the problem behavior is occurring. A number of myths regarding the functional assessment process, which appear to be pervasive within different research and practice communities, will be reviewed in the context of a series of empirical evaluations demonstrating the effectiveness and social validation of a particular functional assessment process. Through lecture, interactive discussion, role play, and authentic application, attendees should be able to conduct interviews to discover reinforcement contingencies that may be influencing problem behavior and then design and implement safe, fast, and effective functional analyses from the interviews to determine the legitimacy of suspected reinforcement contingencies. An iterative interview/analysis process will also be reviewed for situations in which initial analyses do not yield sufficient information to proceed to treatment.

 

Objectives:

1. An attendee should be able to describe the conditions under which the different types of functional assessment (closed and open-ended indirect assessments, formal and informal descriptive assessments, functional analyses) should and should not be used when attempting to understand why problem behavior is occurring.

2. An attendee will be able to describe multiple tactics to improve the safety and efficiency of the functional assessment process, especially the functional analysis part of the process.

3. An attendee should be able to describe the primary objectives of an open-ended functional assessment interview and the interview tactics for achieving these objectives.

4. An attendee will be able to describe various tactics for efficiently determining whether different topographies of problem behavior are influenced by the same reinforcing contingency.

5. Given the results of an open-ended interview, the attendee should be able to design an efficient, individualized (non-standardized) and synthesized functional analysis.

6. Given an undifferentiated initial analysis, the attendee should be able to describe different tactics allowing for the successful redesign of the analysis.

 

Relevant Readings:

Hanley, G. P. (2012). Functional assessment of problem behavior: Dispelling myths, overcoming implementation obstacles, and developing new lore. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 54-72.

Hanley, G. P., Jin, C. S., Vanselow, N. R., & Hanratty, L. A. (2014). Producing meaningful improvements in problem behavior of children with autism via synthesized analyses and treatments. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 47, 16-36.

Jessel, J., Hanley, G. P., & Ghaemmaghami, M. (2016). Interview-informed synthesized contingency analyses: Thirty replications and reanalysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/jaba.316

Santiago, J. L., Hanley, G. P., Moore, K., & Jin, C. S. (2016). The generality of interview-informed functional analyses: Systematic replications in school and home. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46, 797-811.

Slaton, J. & Hanley, G. P., Raftery, K. (2017). Interview-informed functional analyses: A comparison of synthesized and isolated variables. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

Strand R. C. W., Eldevik S. (2017). Improvements in problem behavior in a child with autism spectrum diagnosis through synthesized analysis and treatment: A replication in an EIBI home program. Behavioral Interventions, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1505

 


Part 2

 

Treating Severe Problem Behavior: A Focus on Strengthening Socially Important Behavior and Transferring to Relevant People and Places

 

Abstract: The success of treatments for problem behaviors like meltdowns, self-injury, or aggression is largely dependent on whether the treatment is based on the function the problem behavior serves for the person with autism. But because of the seemingly obligatory focus on detecting the impact of single variables in good behavior analytic research, effective behavioral technology is often fractured across studies, resulting in a dearth of studies showing socially valid improvements in these problem behaviors and an absence of studies illustrating the treatment process from start to finish. In this session, an effective, comprehensive, and parent-validated treatment process for problem behavior will be described. The comparative research that underscores the importance of focusing on the skills of communication, toleration, and contextually appropriate behavior will be reviewed. The logistics of implementing this treatment in a variety of contexts that differ in personnel will be discussed along with procedures for training parents and staff and extending the treatment into relevant contexts over realistic time periods.

 

Objectives:

1. Given different functions of problem behavior, the attendee should be able to design functionally-relevant, effective, and skill-based interventions capable of producing generalizable and socially valid improvements in problem behavior.

2. An attendee will be able to describe strategies for teaching individuals with severe problem behavior to engage in a generalized communication response and then procedures for differentiating the response so that a communication repertoire is established.

3. An attendee will be able to describe the key components of strategies for teaching individuals with severe problem behavior to tolerate both delays to and denials of reinforcers previously maintaining their problem behavior.

4. An attendee should be able to describe how contextually appropriate behavior (compliance, independent academic work and play) may be shaped during delays to the reinforcers that historically maintained problem behavior.

5. An attendee should be able to describe the logistics relevant to treatment development, transfer, and maintenance in the contexts in which they provide services.

 

Relevant Readings:

Hanley, G. P., Jin, C. S., Vanselow, N. R., & Hanratty, L. A. (2014). Producing meaningful improvements in problem behavior of children with autism via synthesized analyses and treatments. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 47, 16-36.

Santiago, J. L., Hanley, G. P., Moore, K., & Jin, C. S. (2016). The generality of interview-informed functional analyses: Systematic replications in school and home. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46, 797-811.

Ghaemmaghami, M., Hanley, G. P., Jin, S., and Vanselow, N. R. (2015) Affirming control by multiple reinforcers via progressive treatment analysis. Behavioral Interventions. 31, 70-86.

Ghaemmaghami, M., Hanley, G. P., & Jessel, J. (2016). Contingencies promote delay tolerance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/jaba.333

Strand R. C. W., Eldevik S. (2017). Improvements in problem behavior in a child with autism spectrum diagnosis through synthesized analysis and treatment: A replication in an EIBI home program. Behavioral Interventions, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1002/bin.1505

 

 


Part 3

 

 

Developing Effective and Preferred Treatments for Stereotypy

 

Abstract: Persons diagnosed with Autism often engage in repetitive acts that appear to serve no function; these acts are collectively referred to as stereotypy due to the formal similarity of the acts and the periodicity with which they are emitted. Behavior analysts are often called upon to develop behavior plans addressing stereotypy when it is exhibited with impairing frequency. In this presentation, treatments that (a) capitalize on the reinforcing nature of stereotypy, (b) teach the appropriate times and places for stereotypy to occur, (c) yield skills that may eventually eclipse stereotypy, and (d) are preferred by the person receiving the treatment will be described. Procedures for extending this treatment model to address ritualistic behaviors and vocal stereotypy will also be described.

 

Objectives:

1. The attendee should be able to describe the conditions under which stereotypy requires intervention and the most appropriate or achievable goals regarding stereotypy.

2. The attendee should be able to describe the behavioral interventions that are not likely to result in long term resolution of stereotypy.

3. The attendee should be able to describe procedures for gaining stimulus control over stereotypy and the importance of the concept of contingency when attempting to design effective and preferred interventions for stereotypy.

 

Relevant Readings:

Hanley, G. P., Iwata, B. A., Thompson, R. H., & Lindberg, J. L. (2000). A component analysis of “using stereotypy as reinforcement” for alternative behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 285-297

Potter, J. N., Hanley, G. P., Augustine, M., Clay, C. J., & Phelps, M. C. (2013). Treating stereotypy in adolescents diagnosed with autism by refining the tactic of “using stereotypy as reinforcement” Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 407-423

Slaton, J. & Hanley, G. P. (2016). Effects of multiple versus chained schedules on stereotypy and functional engagement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. 49, 927–946

 

 


 

Part 4

 

Eating with the Family without Tears: An Effective Process for Addressing Food Selectivity

 

Abstract: Food selectivity is a pervasive problem (67 to 89% of individuals, Silbaugh et al., 2016) among children with developmental disabilities. Food selectivity in this population has primarily been treated through differential reinforcement and extinction. Extinction, especially escape extinction, while efficacious, has multiple potential negative side effects (e.g., increase in problem behaviors such as aggression, gagging, and vomiting). An assessment process for developing a context in which mealtime skills and consumption of non-preferred foods can be shaped without escape extinction and the resulting negative side effects will be described in this session. Once the shaping context is developed, two distinct shaping procedures will be described. Both rely on shaping consumption of non-preferred food with synthesized reinforcers and a partial extinction procedures in which escape is available for all behavior whereas positive reinforcers are only available for appropriate mealtime behaviors that fall within the range dictated by the shaping procedure. One procedure relies on a choice model and reliance on commitment responses and is best suited for children with strong language skills. The other procedures relies on the shaping of mealtime language and toleration skills and is best suited for children with little or emerging language repertoires.

 

Objectives:

1. An attendee should be able to describe the how to conduct interviews to discover preferred and non-preferred foods and the possible contingencies that maintain food selectivity.

2. An attendee should be able to describe the how to design analyses to demonstrate the validity of the discoveries and develop an ecologically valid and motivating context to address food selectivity.

3. An attendee will be able two shaping processes for addressing food selectivity in leaners with and without strong language repertoires that is capable of promoting consumption of highly non-preferred foods without occasioning emotional responding or severe problem behavior.

 

 


Part 5

 

 

Sleep Problems of Children with Autism: Prevalent, Relevant, and Treatable by Behavior Analysts

 

Abstract: Sleep problems are prevalent among children, especially children with autism and negatively impact the wellbeing of both the child and their family. They are, however, amenable to treatment by applied behavior analysts. In this presentation, the specific process used by applied behavior analysts for addressing sleep problems, such as taking too long to fall asleep, waking frequently at night, sleeping for only short durations each night, will be described. Critical features of behavioral intervention for sleep problems will be described along with the bio-behavioral conceptual system that guides applied behavior analysts when they attempt to first understand the variables influencing sleep problems and then design personalized interventions.

 

Objectives:

1. An attendee will be able describe the assessment process that allows for the identification of likely causes of persistent delayed sleep onset and night awakenings in young children.

2. An attendee will be able to describe aspects of nighttime routines, schedules, and dependencies that promote or inhibit healthy sleep.

3. An attendee will be able to describe the various function-based treatments for nighttime problem behavior that interferes with sleep onset or the resumption of sleep.

 

Relevant Reading

Jin, C. S., Hanley, G. P., & Beaulieu, L. (2013). An individualized and comprehensive approach to treating sleep problems in young children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 161-180